Tea ceremony in Hamburg – the Meßmer MOMENTUM world of experience

Tea ceremony in Hamburg – the Meßmer MOMENTUM world of experience

Indeed there are currently more spectacular attractions to be discovered in Hamburg than the Meßmer MOMENTUM in the HafenCity. One thing that is essential during a trip to Hamburg is a visit to the Elbe Philharmonic Hall with its unusual architecture, which has not only attracted curious people from all over the world since its opening in January 2017.
However, the Meßmer MOMENTUM from the Elphi – as the concert hall is affectionately called – is only a few minutes’ walk away and therefore it is also en route for many guests passing through the HafenCity. Meßmer is very well placed in this strategically favourable location, on the one hand located in the HafenCity, but also alongside other worlds of enjoyment in the HafenCity and the surrounding area. This attracts visitors and then leads them on to the next attraction – only a few minutes away from each other. Further attractions in the network of worlds of enjoyment found in Hamburg are Kölln-Haferland, Chocoversum by Hachez, the Speicherstadt Kaffeerösterei and Spicy’s spice museum.
Today it is about the Meßmer MOMENTUM, which is known as the tea Mecca; as it was known in the press release with its opening back in 2008.
A comprehensive renovation was carried out in 2016, which gave a clearer division and structure of the individual experiences of the MOMENTUM. Spread across more than 700 square metres of exhibition space, the Meßmer brand welcomes its customers and guests with a central entrance area from the shop and the tea creation, as well as the tea lounge. The tea museum is located behind the lounge and can be accessed from the lounge itself or via a separate entrance from the outside. A beautiful terrace invites you to enjoy tea with a view over the HafenCity.
These are the good and less good little details that can be noticed and felt by an attentive observer when they spend some time in the Meßmer MOMENTUM.
These are, on the one hand, the attentive and competent sales assistants, who offer an unimaginable variety of teas in the shop with various mixtures or formats. The shop is set up to look like an ancient pharmacy and is decorated in warm shades, but still feels bright and attractive. It is perhaps a little too full of things that revolve around the tea product itself, but that is a question of taste. A very nice idea is the sale of a single bag on a type of pyramid of any tea bag variety that is in the Meßmer range. This means that tea drinkers that don’t drink so much or that are a little curious can dare to try a new variety or flavour.
But how does such a tea taster work, someone who invests and tests goods and new creations? What Meßmer describes as the heart of the Momentum is, unfortunately, only to be experienced by visitors by prior booking, or once a week on Thursdays for half an hour. This is of course a pity that the work of the people involved with the tea product is only rarely seen and ultimately is only revealed to the visitor by chance – or if they had booked for one of the events. Unfortunately, a large part of the tea experience – a direct viewing and perhaps also the chance to talk with the tea experts on site – is not available to many visitors. Meßmer will have reasons for this, but they were not decisions that were made with the customer in mind – and above all possible new customers that are randomly passing by.
The tea lounge is distinguished by its elegance and cosiness, providing guests with a huge tea selection that makes it really difficult to choose from. But friendly staff are also here to offer you ample advice.
Perhaps then, the tea museum in the rear area should compensate a little for what is not always to be seen in the live presentation by the tea experts. The museum topics are divided into a diverse range of partition walls and presentation tables. It gives the impression that everything was adjusted in the now much smaller space of the museum compared with the original 2008 structure and what was present before. This results in a confined space that can be occupied by ten visitors at a time. A central theme, guidance system or even numbering, as visitors pass through the museum, is an indication error. The visitor is unfortunately left alone here and although the contents of each stage are actually quite interesting, access to them is not very inviting. Drawers with smelling samples, footage such as advertising are discussed and the aspect of recipes is described in detail. The only problem is that everything is tightly packed without a concept and process, which is just as much for the brand and its appearance in the MOMENTUM as for the visitors themselves, who certainly have higher expectations when entering the world of experience.
So it may be noted that the idea at Meßmer – its own shop as a whole experience with tasting and a museum – certainly contributes to a great extent to the good image of the brand. However, what has been thought out and implemented with little consistency and strategy are the areas of tea creation and the museum, which on the one hand allow little proximity and on the other hand integrates too little for the visitor to reflect on. For this reason, a brand museum should also be aimed at visitors, allowing them to participate and giving them a voice as well. Therefore, a brand can also create an emotional proximity to visitors, guests or future customers. This is because identification with the product and the company comes about as a result of emotions. And that is actually what every brand desires.